Influenza A (H1N1) - Swine Flu

Vads Corner - H1N1 Influenza A - Swine Flu site

This page is dedicated to H1N1 Influenza A virus. It was setup as a result of the outbreak in Mexico (2009). This page will be updated when information is available. Meanwhile see Updates .You are welcome to suggest links or comments related to this site by e-mailing directly to me or mentioning the link in the guestbook. I however have the right to moderate these links. Please read the disclaimer.

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First up on 27 April 2009

Last Updated 23 August 2009

 

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Case Definitions for Infection with Swine Influenza A (H1N1) Virus

A confirmed case of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection is defined as a person with an influenza-like illness with laboratory confirmed novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection by one or more of the following tests:
  1. real-time RT-PCR
  2. viral culture

A probable case of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection is defined as a person with an influenza-like-illness who is

  • positive for influenza A, but negative for human H1 and H3 by influenza RT_PCR

Optional

A suspected case of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection is defined as a person who does not meet the confirmed or probable case definition, and is not novel H1N1 test negative, and is/has:

  • a previously healthy person < 65 years hospitalized for ILI

OR

  • ILI and resides in a state without confirmed cases, but has traveled to a state or country where there are one or more confirmed or probable cases

OR

  • ILI and has an epidemiologic link in the past 7 days to a confirmed case or probable case

Influenza-like-illness (ILI) is defined as fever (temperature of 100F [37.8C] or greater) and a cough and/or a sore throat in the absence of a KNOWN cause other than influenza

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Influenza A (H1N1): Revised Guidelines released by Ministry of Health & Family Welfare - India (14 Aug 2009)

In order to prevent and contain outbreak of Influenza-A H1N1 virus for screening, testing and isolation following guidelines are to be followed:

At first all individuals seeking consultations for flu like symptoms should be screened at healthcare facilities both Government and private or examined by a doctor and these will be categorized as under:

Category- A :

  • Patients with mild fever plus cough / sore throat with or without body ache, headache, diarrhoea and vomiting will be categorised as Category-A. They do not require Oseltamivir and should be treated for the symptoms mentioned above.The patients should be monitored for their progress and reassessed at 24 to 48 hours by the doctor.

  • No testing of the patient for H1N1 is required.

  • Patients should confine themselves at home and avoid mixing up with public and high risk members in the family.

Category-B:

  1. In addition to all the signs and symptoms mentioned under Category-A, if the patient has high grade fever and severe sore throat, may require home isolation and Oseltamivir;

  2. In addition to all the signs and symptoms mentioned under Category-A, individuals having one or more of the following high risk conditions shall be treated with Oseltamivir:

    • Children less than 5 years old;

    • Pregnant women;

    • Persons aged 65 years or older;

    • Patients with lung diseases, heart disease, liver disease, kidney disease, blood disorders, diabetes, neurological disorders, cancer and HIV/AIDS;

    • Patients on long term cortisone therapy.

  • No tests for H1N1 is required for Category-B (1) and (2).

  • All patients of Category-B (1) and (2) should confine themselves at home and avoid mixing with public and high risk members in the family.

Category-C

In addition to the above signs and symptoms of Category-A and B, if the patient has one or more of the following:

  • Breathlessness, chest pain, drowsiness, fall in blood pressure, sputum mixed with blood, bluish discolouration of nails;

  • Irritability among small children, refusal to accept feed;

  • Worsening of underlying chronic conditions.

All these patients mentioned above in Category-C require testing, immediate hospitalization and treatment.

Source: http://mohfw-h1n1.nic.in/

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MEDLINE abstracts (NLM PubMed).

Source: National Center For National Biotechnology Information(NCBI). When you read the MEDLINE (NLM PubMed) abstract click on Links: Related Articles.

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First up on 27 April 2009

Last Updated 23 August 2009

Home

Software

Hindu

Malaysian

Kids

Cybermed

Japanese Encephalitis

Dioxin

Paramyxoviridae

Manipal Alumni

Web Search

SARS

Medline

Med. Journal

Medical

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Rift Valley Fever Outbreak

West Nile Fever

Arsenic

Chikungunya Virus

Haze

Enterovirus Outbreak

Anthrax